espruen:

nutastic:

Okay so apparently that Gnome Child in all the slayer posts is actually a 4 year old Runescape NPC who has the mental capacity of a wise old philosopher and speaks about philosophy and the existence of god and such

image

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nutastic espruen
shitfestcomic imissnepeta
mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter clgdoublelifts
Useful Writing Websites

fictionwritingtips:

I compiled most of the writing websites I’ve mentioned on my blog into one post. I find a lot of these sites useful, so hopefully they can help you out!

Imagination Prompt Generator: This give you a one-sentence writing prompt that will help you come up with ideas. I think it also allows you to set a ten minute timer for each prompt.

Wridea: I really like this site because you can write down simple ideas that you can organize later and put into a bigger project. You can share these ideas or the site will help you randomly match ideas. It’s great for brainstorming and building a fully formed outline.

List of Unusual Words — Here’s a site you can browse through that gives you a list of unusual words for every letting in the alphabet. If you’re looking to switch up your vocab, or looking to develop a way a character speaks, this is a good reference.

Picometer — Here’s a writing progress meter that can be embedded on your site or blog. There’s also the Writertopia meter that shows word count/current mood. 

Cut Up Machine: This website takes whatever words you typed or pasted into the box and rearranges your sentences. It’s not practical for writing a novel, but it might help with poetry OR coming up with ideas. Experiment with it and see what you can come up with.

Orion’s Arm: This is a great website to use if you want to research worldbuilding or if you have science questions. There are tons of resources you can use.

Word Frequency Counter: If you’re finding that you’re using the same words over and over again, this website should help. You’ll be able to count the frequency usage of each word in your text. This should help you switch up the words you’re using and understand where the problem might be.

Phrase Frequency Counter: This is same site explained above, but it counts the phrases you’re using.

My Writing Nook: This allows you to write or jot down ideas wherever you are. You don’t need to have your laptop in order to access it, so it might help you during this time. You can write as long as you have your phone.

Writer: The Internet Typewriter - This site lets you write, save, share, and/or convert your writing online. I tried it out and it’s pretty cool. It saves for you and is a great way to brainstorm or plan out some ideas.

The Forge - The Forge is a fantasy, creature, spell, and location name generator. It’s awesome.

One Word: This site gives you one word to write about for 60 seconds. This should help you get started with your own writing and will work as a writing prompt to get you warmed up. It’s a great way to get yourself motivated.

Confusing Words:  On this site you can search through confusing words that often stump many writers. It’s not a huge reference, but it should help you with some writing/grammar issues.

Cliché Finder: This site allows you to enter parts of your writing and it will search for clichés. If you find that you’re using the same phrases over and over again, this will help a lot. I haven’t messed around with it too much, but it looks useful.

Hand Written Fonts: If you’re looking for great hand written fonts, this is a great reference. All of them are pretty awesome.

Tip of My Tongue — you know when you’re trying to think of a specific word, but you just can’t remember what it is? This site will help you narrow down your thoughts and find that word you’ve been looking for. It can be extremely frustrating when you have to stop writing because you get a stuck on a word, so this should help cut that down. 

-Kris Noel

fictionwritingtips toastyhat
dimisfit:

comicsalliance:

GENE LUEN YANG TO COMIC CREATORS: DON’T LET FEAR STOP YOU FROM WRITING DIVERSE CHARACTERS
By Matt D. Wilson
In a speech at the National Book Festival at the Library of Congress last weekend, The Shadow Hero writer Gene Luen Yang threw down the gauntlet.
Yang challenged comics creators to overcome their fears of bring criticized for inaccurately portraying characters who are different from them — in terms of race, gender, or other identifying factors. In brief, he told writers to do some research and get it right, but first and foremost to step outside themselves.
Here’s a brief excerpt:

We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.
This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.
After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.

READ MORE

Very rousing and inspiring to read, especially since this is a topic I struggle within my own stories. As much as I want representation and diversity within media, I find myself struggling to add more of it within my own content because of an overwhelming fear of misrepresentation and criticism.
But the first steps are going to be messy. That’s okay. I need to remember that.
Quotations I would like to remember for the future: 

“We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.”
"… And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.
Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.

dimisfit:

comicsalliance:

GENE LUEN YANG TO COMIC CREATORS: DON’T LET FEAR STOP YOU FROM WRITING DIVERSE CHARACTERS

By Matt D. Wilson

In a speech at the National Book Festival at the Library of Congress last weekend, The Shadow Hero writer Gene Luen Yang threw down the gauntlet.

Yang challenged comics creators to overcome their fears of bring criticized for inaccurately portraying characters who are different from them — in terms of race, gender, or other identifying factors. In brief, he told writers to do some research and get it right, but first and foremost to step outside themselves.

Here’s a brief excerpt:

We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.

This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.

After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.


READ MORE

Very rousing and inspiring to read, especially since this is a topic I struggle within my own stories. As much as I want representation and diversity within media, I find myself struggling to add more of it within my own content because of an overwhelming fear of misrepresentation and criticism.

But the first steps are going to be messy. That’s okay. I need to remember that.

Quotations I would like to remember for the future: 

We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.”

"… And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.

Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.

comicsalliance toastyhat

vergess:

plutonis:

vergess:

wargsansa:

whoever invents headphones that are comfortable to sleep in will get so rich

image

[SleepPhones] are headphones wrapped in a padded fleece headband. I have a pair, and they’re quite nice.

Get out of here……

So I guess I managed to leave the link out of that post, sorry!

http://www.sleepphones.com/store/sleepphones-store/sleepphones-4

wargsansa toastyhat
toastyhat:

Another commission for seajuju; in short, in a world where humankind is fighting the horrorterrors, Karkat is created as a human/horrorterror hybird (thus the horns and gray skin).  He’s told only that he was “infected” with something and that they are searching for a cure, but he suspects the truth and this image expresses that fear.
Unfortunately there isn’t an actual posted story for you to read about this one!
—
COMMISSION INFO

toastyhat:

Another commission for seajuju; in short, in a world where humankind is fighting the horrorterrors, Karkat is created as a human/horrorterror hybird (thus the horns and gray skin).  He’s told only that he was “infected” with something and that they are searching for a cure, but he suspects the truth and this image expresses that fear.

Unfortunately there isn’t an actual posted story for you to read about this one!

COMMISSION INFO

korranation:

Hey Korra Nation, BIG NEWS!!!
IF THIS PICTURE (drawn by the one-and-only Bryan K) GETS OVER 15,000 NOTES, WE’LL RELEASE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVE CLIP FROM BOOK 4 ONLINE TOMORROW MORNING!
So what’re you waiting for? Let’s do this!!!

korranation:

Hey Korra Nation, BIG NEWS!!!

IF THIS PICTURE (drawn by the one-and-only Bryan K) GETS OVER 15,000 NOTES, WE’LL RELEASE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVE CLIP FROM BOOK 4 ONLINE TOMORROW MORNING!

So what’re you waiting for? Let’s do this!!!

korranation toastyhat
hazeisnotafro paperseverywhere

theheroheart:

sushigal007:

a-creepy-wholockian:

phoenix-aflame:

benjaminminu:

How the fuck did he get hired there giving his name as “The Doctor”?

Im pretty sure he either used psychic paper or said “fuck it” and just made his own name tag and pretended he was hired.

I have one of those Doctor Who books that gives extra info on stuff and someone made up the application he sent to get hired and you really have to find it and see it because it’s pure gold. He put his age as like 1,200 and crossed it out and put 50 or something then wrote “Is that too high?” and crossed that out too and just wrote 29

I know I already reblogged it, but I had a feeling I’d seen that application IRL, so I dug out my books and went looking.

:)

image

i cant

timelordgifs genuinedeadpool
ebonynightwriter:

so sometimes i like to think i can draw people 

ebonynightwriter:

so sometimes i like to think i can draw people 

ebonynightwriter baelor