silisboo:

Day 8, fave song.
Beatdown Round 2

silisboo:

Day 8, fave song.

Beatdown Round 2

silisboo chickenstab
prinseissa
admantist:

yes.

admantist:

yes.

sonnetstuck:

official retcon

everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual Comedy
Because he’s just better than everyone else.

(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)

everyframeapainting insanitybreach

hi-nu-roly:

chongotheartist:

theyatemytailorr:

never in my life did I think that toilet doors would make me so angry

i love you chongo

theyatemytailorr waroverskaia
doctor-catson fuck-lemonade
awwww-cute:

Our new kitten

awwww-cute:

Our new kitten

awwww-cute faygo-fuckyourself

ducktheripper:

"Why isn’t this a real thing?"

image

larg-marg slangwang

sixpenceee:

Koko the gorilla, is a female gorilla who is able to understand more than 1000 signs on the the American Sign Language system and over 2000 words of spoken English. 

Koko had a pet kitten, which she received on her birthday on July 1984. It was noted that Koko cared for that kitten as if it were a little baby gorilla. The kitten one day escaped from Koko’s cage and was hit by a car.

When she was told of what happened, this is how she responded.

It was also noted that afterwards she made weeping sounds like a human.

You can watch the full video here

And for anyone whose interested in animal language, here’s an interesting article on researchers translating chimp language

sixpenceee homes4catgirls
currentsinbiology:


These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack
There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.
A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.


Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

currentsinbiology:

These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack

There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.

A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc